Valley of the Tigers
The Valley of the Tigers is composed of three distinct areas: the Siberian Tiger compound, the Sumatran Tiger compound, and at the center, the temple, a covered space, intended to inform and to raise the visitors’ awareness for these species.
 
The moment you climb the Valley of the Tigers steps, you notice eight large vertical tubes in acrylic, filled with Styrofoam balls. Each one represents a subspecies of tiger, and the level to which it is filled shows us how many animals of this subspecies exist in the wild.

It is impossible not to realize that three of the tubes are empty. This means that three of the subspecies are extinct: the Bali tiger, the Caspian Tiger, and the Java tiger. As for the two species present in the Zoo, it is estimated that, in their natural state, there are only 480 Siberian tigers and 400 Sumatran tigers left, the first being species considered "endangered" and the second one "critically endangered". 

In this space, we also learn that there are only around 6000 tigers left in the wild, including all subspecies, and we learn their characteristics, as well as their main threats. 
Who lives in the Valley?

The Valley is home to two families. On the one hand, a couple of Siberian tigers, the largest felines in existence; on the other hand, mother, father and cub form an aggregate of Sumatran tigers, the smallest subspecies of tigers in the world, known for its long and thin stripes.


Map  
Both the Siberian and the Sumatran tigers’ compounds include an outer area and inside facilities. Outside, the animals have plenty of space to run, several trees to climb, diverse vegetation, a pond and a wooden structure, with bridges and elevated platforms, where they can hide. There are no bars around whatsoever. Only glass and net. 

Who lives in the Valley?
The Valley is home to two families. On the one hand, a couple of Siberian tigers, the largest felines in existence; on the other hand, mother, father and cub form an aggregate of Sumatran tigers, the smallest subspecies of tigers in the world, known for its long and thin stripes. They live in separate compounds because they would not cross each other’s paths in their natural habitat and because, to favor biodiversity and the conservation of species, it is important that each of them keep their genetic characteristics.

The Siberian tigers
Tantan is the male from Siberia. He was born at the Zoo in July 2006. Natalia, the female, was born in England in May 2009 and arrived at the Zoo in 2012. She came under the species breeding program (EEP) to form a couple with Tantan and procreate. When she arrived, it took her about 20 days for her to go to the outside. Today, she remains shy, but already feels at home and reproduction has gone well, as they have already had several litters. 
 
Sumatran tigers,
On this side, mother and cub live together, but away from the father, with whom they alternate being in the outer and inner areas. It has to be that way, so that Sigli, the female, can rest and care for the cub. Sigli was born in 2002 and came from the Netherlands in 2004. Pendekar, the father, was born in 2005 and arrived from England. Both have adapted well and the couple had already had several litters. The latter, with whom Sigli now shares the compound, turned one year old in 8 September and is also a female, as of yet without a name. 
 
The Valley of the Tigers is situated on the Zoo’s main avenue, right after the passage to the ticket office.

Come and meet this space and the animals that live here!
 
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Zoo Imagem TAGS: vale , dos , tigres , tigra , de , siberia , tigre , de , sumatra , zoo , jardim , zoologico
DESCRIPTION: O Vale dos Tigres e composto por tres espacos distintos: as instalacoes do Tigre-da-siberia, as do Tigre-de-sumatra e, no centro, o templo, um espaco coberto, destinado a informar e a sensibilizar os visitantes para estas especies.